Outlining: the “W” Storyboard

W Storyboard

W Storyboard

The “W” Storyboard… one of my favs. As I’ve mentioned, I first discovered the “W” Storyboard from author Mary Carroll Moore. It set off a lot of lightbulbs and really helped me find the hero’s journey. I discovered through using this storyboard that my MC was “offstage” for part of the story and by the time I finished, he was front row and center! (I’m also working through/blogging my journey through Mary Carroll Moore’s book, Your Book Starts Here, if you’re interested in joining me or reading about it). So here we go…

What is the “W” Storyboard?

The “W” Storyboard is a visual map of your story, with the story being marked along the three act structure. The “W” looks something like this picture, which I found on Pinterest (note: it hasn’t been filled in):

W Storyboard

W Storyboard

Starting where you would if you were writing the letter “W” is the inciting incident (triggering event). This is where your story begins. As you follow the first leg down, the problems are being set and tensions rise. At the bottom of the first leg is the first crisis moment (turning point)  that propels us into act 2 and calls the hero to action.

The second leg of the “W” is traveling upward and it’s during this time that the problem is being resolved. Things may continue to get better. A new character may show up. But at the top of Act 2, another conflict happens (pop moment) and pushes us into the second half of act two (the next leg of the “W”), where things spiral to the lowest point. Problems deepen and at the bottom of that leg, it is the hero’s lowest point.

The final leg of the “W” travels upward. This is act 3, where the problems resolve. Towards the top of act 3, there’s an “epiphany moment,” which is usually when the the hero has an inner resolution of some kind. Maybe they understand something in a new way. At the top of this leg is the resolution (or end).

There are two things I love about the “W”:

  1. The shape of the “W” visually follows the main rise and fall that happens in the story.
  2. You can use the “W” storyboard in many different ways. Yes, it’s great to chart your hero’s journey, but you can also plot another character’s journey along it which is super helpful for finding the holes in your story and making sure events and characters intersect when they’re supposed to.

When  I first plotted my story on one of these, I was shocked/appauled/relieved that my main character was nearly missing from the second half of act 2! (Appauled that I didn’t catch any of this in my first draft, relieved that I found out why my story seemed to go South in act 2.) Somehow a supporting character had found their way into the center of the story and didn’t want to leave the stage!

Nowadays, I revisit the “W” often, as in every few scenes often. I can adapt and make changes through the writing process, but also keep the bird’s eye view.

How to Plot Your Story on the “W” Storyboard

There are a number of ways to add your plot points to the “W” storyboard. As you’ll see in this picture, which I found on Carrot Ranch, post-it notes are a wonderful option:

Post-It Notes on

Post-It Notes on “W” Storyboard

For my “W” I use the entire floor of my living room and place all my notecards on the floor, following the “W” shape. (For my information about how I outline using notecards, go here). By starting with notecards and truly dumping every possible event onto them, then placing them along the “W” storyboard, I was able to quickly elliminate the unneccessary points. It took me a looonnngg time to complete the cards and form the “W,” but it was soooo worth it for getting to the essence of my story. By the time I was finished, my hero was center stage, the whole way through!

If you want to learn more about the “W,” Mary Carroll Moore has a wonderful lecture on the “W” storyboard and you can see it here.

Do you have tips to share about storyboarding? Do you use the “W” or recommend something else? Drop a comment below if you like.

Until next time, happy writing to You,

Ellie

What I’m listening to this week:

Taylor Davis’ violin version of Now We are Free (beautiful!)

Craig Armstrong’s Romeo & Juliet (balcony scene)

Love this piano rendition of Karthik Krish’s Titanic

To read this article and many more, hop over to my new site!

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: Ch. 2 of Your Book Starts Here (Outer Story vs. Inner Story) | Ellie Lewis

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